Positive Affect Regulation for HIV Prevention in People with Mood Disorders

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Investigator: Judith T. Moskowitz, PhD, MPH
Sponsor: NIH National Institute of Mental Health

Location(s): United States

Description

There are two overarching questions: (1) for whom does the intervention work and (2) in what delivery format? Co-morbid mood disorders are a significant concern for both primary and secondary HIV prevention. The Overall Aims are to: (1) Provide expanded mentoring of early career clinicians and trainees in patient-oriented research in the specific areas of positive affect regulation interventions, mood disorders, HIV, and, more broadly, in integration of social and behavioral sciences in patient-oriented research; and (2) Extend the current research program to tailor the content and format of a positive affect regulation intervention to maximize feasibility, safety, and efficacy for people living with mood disorders and to maximize transportability to difficult-to-reach populations who are at elevated risk of HIV by translating the modified intervention to computer-delivered format. The ultimate goal for this program of research is to amplify the public health impact for individuals living with, or at risk for, HIV, by broadening applicability of the intervention and by encouraging widespread dissemination to home and community settings. The plans for development, research, and mentoring were designed to complement each other and to create a synergistic effect of mentoring and research in a new direction of patient-oriented research. The proposed mentoring, research, and career development activities actively leverage existing infrastructure, resources, and training initiatives provided by NIH, including Dr. Moskowitz's active research program, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. The short term goals of the proposed research are to tailor the content and format of the current positive affect intervention to maximize safety, feasibility, and applicability for people with mood disorders and to translate the modified intervention to computer- delivered format. The longer term objectives of this line of research are to maximize the public health impact of the positive affect intervention for people living with, or at risk for, HIV, by increasing the broad applicability of the intervention and by encouraging widespread dissemination to home and community settings. I outline a systematic plan to make a lasting contribution to both primary and secondary HIV prevention by leveraging my current research program to facilitate the transition to independence for mentees.