13Th International Meeting of the Society for Natural Immunity April 20-24, 2012

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Investigator: Lewis L. Lanier, PhD
Sponsor: NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Location(s): United States

Description

NK cells are a relatively small subset of immune cells, but they are important in many clinical areas, including (i) protection against viruses and other pathogens, (ii protection against cancer, (iii) regulation of other forms of immunity, including autoimmunity and immune deficiency, and (iv) successful pregnancy. They are also important in determining the success of transplantation, particularly hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Since 1982, most researchers interested in NK cells have met approximately every 18 months to share their findings, to facilitate collaborations, and to help advance the careers of young investigators in the field. Since its inception, the meeting has been a favored venue for the presentation of new, important findings. All presentations at the meeting are in a single session, to encourage cross-fertilization, particularly between bench scientists and clinical investigators. The last meeting was September 2010, in Cavtat, Yugoslavia. The next meeting will be April 20-24, 2012, at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California, about 100 miles south of San Francisco. Expected participation is 400-500 researchers, with about 40 oral presentations and 200 poster presentations. All participants will be fed and housed together to encourage personal interactions. This application is to support attendance, particularly by scientific trainees, at an international conference on natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are a relatively small subset of immune cells, but they are important in many clinical areas, including (i) protection against viruses and other pathogens, (ii) protection against cancer, (iii) regulation of other forms of immunity, including autoimmunity and immune deficiency, and (iv) successful pregnancy. They are also important in determining the success of transplantation, particularly hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.